How To Identify 1916 Standing Liberty Quarter
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The image on the left is the hair curl of an authentic 1916 Standing Quarter, and you can see that the second curl curves almost parallel with the large curl. The 1917 Type 1 (right image) does not curve the same and appears much straighter.
The image on the left is the drapery of an authentic 1916 Standing Quarter, and you can see that the drapery is above the block. The 1917 Type 1 (right image) the drapery is below the edge of the block.
The image on the left is the bottom of the left robe of an authentic 1916 Standing Quarter, and you can see the bottom is flatter and has a smaller opening compared to the 1917 Type 1 (right image) robe bottom. Also the bottom of the robe on a authentic 1916 has a wider space in between it and the date block compared to the 1917.
The image on the left is the big toe on the right foot (as you're looking at the face of the coin) of 1916 Standing Quarter, notice that it's much larger than the toe of the 1917 in the right image. However, the toe is often smashed from wear and can look larger on a 1917, so look closely, and consider the other markers before making a final decision.
1916 Standing Quarter Reverse
1917 Type 1 Standing Quarter Reverse
When it comes to no date Standing Quarters most collectors first look at the reverse to see if they're no stars, since an authentic 1916 doesn't have any stars, but the 1917 Type 1 doesn't have stars either. So it's important to use the obverse features to identify an authentic 1916 Standing Quarter.
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