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US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 6:59 pm
by Daniel
I figured we will see this happen more and more.

http://www.coinworld.com/voices/bill-gi ... tentlinks#

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 7:34 pm
by Paul
D,
i find these coins VERY INTERESTING......

which leads me to the "DOT CENTS"......for instance, the Lincoln "wheats", just as an example, that had their dies "intentionally altered", with a small 'dot marker', to identify a coin as it was hit during a run, when a 'suspect employee' was on shift, to catch that person, if, in fact, they were up to some funny business...

:eureka:
we are aware of the 1875 Indian Cent, with it's "reverse dot" (FS-01-1875-801), but i have located others,....that sure do look as if there were 'intentional die dots'placed on the die, that would, or should(?) be included here ??
:confused: :dunno :confused:
whistling2:

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Fri Mar 25, 2016 8:10 pm
by Daniel
It is a good addition to the whole story. A lot more mint errors and rare coins have come out of the mint illegal than people realize. I would say that most patterns, major mint errors and coins like the 1913 V Nickel all came out of the mint illegally.

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 4:37 am
by GoldStacker
does this concern coins which belong to the family treasures? I mean, those which were inherited from their grand grand grand grand parents?

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 6:09 am
by Daniel
It would include anything that was removed from the mint illegally and at anytime the US Mint was in operation. It has to be proven that the coin was removed without appropriate permission.

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 8:34 am
by Paul
GoldStacker wrote:does this concern coins which belong to the family treasures? I mean, those which were inherited from their grand grand grand grand parents?
D, have you hugeeyes / read anywhere,.....where they have specifically identified, that a certain piece, was removed by a'known mint employee', ....& most likely 'passed on' that piece to their legacy ??
.....& is 'why' it survives today.

with the exception of the "1875 DOT N IHC"

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 9:07 am
by mhonzell
Without a read, I'd have to categorize: cancelled coins & webbing as outright attempts by mint employees trying to make a buck. And these are not even errors or patterns.

Most patterns were given to members of Congress for approval of a type. These were not to be kept or passed on, but destroyed when the final product was selected.

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 9:18 am
by dipper13
Many of these have been known for decades. There should be a time limit, a statute of limitations, if you will. As time goes on facts become cloudy or even change , next they will confiscate coins from the 1800s. Boo

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 10:06 am
by mhonzell
There is a 7 year statue of limitations for coins in public that should not have been released. But, that only applies IF the coin was released to the public. This makes it questionable for any pattern coin that was not the finally accepted type.

The mint has lost in general, if the coin was handed out by the mint to an individual. So, most pattern coins are safe.

But, if the coin was never handed over to anyone in the public for inspection or approval, then it is not safe. Instead, it can be considered counterfeit currency. And that is a completely different ball game.

All coins made by the US Mint, since they opened, are still considered legal currency once released to the public, whether it was continued to be made, or not.. If not released, but bearing the requirements for legal tender, then it's counterfeit money. This gets that little group of black cloaked men on your tail.

Passing on these coins to someone else is an attempt at personal gain with a false currency and resets the statue of limitations for counterfeiting. It's a difficult case either way, so the mint simply confiscates the coin and awaits you to prove it wasn't for personal gain.

Notice that you only hear about this when one pops up for sale.

Re: US Mint seeking coins to confiscate?

Posted: Tue Jul 05, 2016 12:53 pm
by mhonzell
How many of these Presidential dollars were not really errors. Instead, they were simply stolen prior to receiving their edge lettering. $2.4 million dollars worth.

http://www.nbcwashington.com/news/weird ... 18468.html

Or, this guy...

Http://lubbockonline.com/stories/091300 ... 3vl1p9OnqB