Foreign coin production at us mints.

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PetesPockets55
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Foreign coin production at us mints.

#1 Unread post by PetesPockets55 » Sat Oct 28, 2017 12:05 pm

Oct2017_MintErrorNews1947ElSalvador1Centavo.png
This graph is a screenshot from the link below to MinterrorNews.com. A big "Thank you!" to them.

We've had the subject of foreign coin production at US mints come up before.
If I remember correctly, someone (P?) was looking for client countries, years of production, designs, denominations and alloys.
I came across a page from MintErrorNews.com that has a pretty detailed list. Click this link:
..................Forein Coin Production at US mints
.
ps. I am looking into a 1948s AU Lincoln cent I found on a 2.3g copper looking (NOT CuNi) planchet. Could just be under size/rolled thin or "split planchet before the strike" of course (no striations on the surface though indicating a split planchet), but my imagination is rampant today! lol:
The closest foreign I have found is the 1947 El Salvador 1 Centavo @ 2.5g, 95% copper and 5% tin/zinc. Very odd reverse with lots of "dimpling" or "wavey" on 100% of the devices. (Maybe a liquid(?) interfering with the design transfer because no devices are missing, although they are "skinny", as with "struck through grease")
I will post images from my phone in a separate thread when I figure out how to get them from there to here. :confused:
Thanks for looking.



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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#2 Unread post by mhonzell » Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:52 am

There are five pdf files that can be downloaded for free from different locations. Search criteria: "Domestic and Foreign Coins Manufactured by Mints of the United States 1793-19xx", which is the title of the document.
Substitute for "xx": 65, 70, 73, 76, 80

Do you know of any that are later? I've heard there is one that goes into the 1990s. I would think they have to keep some kind of record more often than once a decade.

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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#3 Unread post by Daniel » Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:47 am

Sounds like a spark erosion counterfeiter or a coin dipped in acid.

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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#4 Unread post by PetesPockets55 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:05 am

mhonzell wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 12:52 am
There are five pdf files that can be downloaded for free from different locations. Search criteria: "Domestic and Foreign Coins Manufactured by Mints of the United States 1793-19xx", which is the title of the document.
Substitute for "xx": 65, 70, 73, 76, 80

Do you know of any that are later? I've heard there is one that goes into the 1990s. I would think they have to keep some kind of record more often than once a decade.

Thanks Mark. I don't know of any later ones.
But I would think the same site ( MintErrorNews.com ) I found would have current information since they are all about mint errors.

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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#5 Unread post by PetesPockets55 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:41 am

Daniel wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:47 am
Sounds like ................. a coin dipped in acid.
Daniel, You nailed it just from my description.

No doubts at all now about it being an acid dipped coin (or Draino).
I have to laugh at myself (again) because each time I convinced myself I could retire (not!) because of this rare find (struck on a foreign planchet), another nagging question would pop into my pretzel brain, that made this "error" not fit the evidence. I shrugged off the lack of a rim to it being undersized, but something was bugging me about that as well. Duh!
The acid really reduces the rims and can make it look like it never went through the upsetting machine.
Oh well, it's back out of retirement.
ps.Anyone know why the "trenching" around the devices of ONE CENT are so deep and prominent? That part was throwing me.
)Apologies for no obverse image but computer keeps saving it as an incorrect file and can't load it here.) :dunno
Attachments
Rev1_1948sAcidDippedLC_Oct2017.jpg
1948s Acid dipped LWC Rev.
Rev2_Zoom1948sAcidDippedLC_Oct2017.jpg
1948s Acid dipped LWC Rev. Zoom
Rev4LeftWheat_1948sAcidDippedLC_Oct2017.jpg

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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#6 Unread post by Daniel » Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:43 pm

It's how the acid erodes it where it is less dense in the fields around the more dense relief is my guess.

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Re: Foreign coin production at us mints.

#7 Unread post by PetesPockets55 » Sun Oct 29, 2017 7:38 pm

Daniel wrote:
Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:43 pm
It's how the acid erodes it where it is less dense in the fields around the more dense relief is my guess.
Thanks Daniel. I was leaning towards different density in that area being the culprit as well.

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