Civil War Tokens

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mhonzell
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#61 Unread post by mhonzell »

Thanks! They are fun to collect and comment upon.

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Re: Civil War Tokens

#62 Unread post by Daniel »

Yea, me too. I think it's great but sad history.

One thing to learn from all of this is that this country hasn't always been problem free from the beginning. We have had some decades that were peaceful to make it seem like there's the good old times, and add to that we tend to attach much emotion to life events when we're young.

So all of us think it was better when we were young but in reality, if you read history, you will see it wasn't the best then either. When I was born and through my first years we had Vietnam but I was having a grand old time and seemed like the best times.

It was followed by over a decade of mostly peace but still remember a few bad things in the news during the 80's and then the Gulf War came about. So yes we can gain some perspectives of life through history.

Keep them coming M!

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Re: Civil War Tokens

#63 Unread post by mhonzell »

For those with an interest, the Civil War Token Society has finally updated the United States Civil War Store Card book. The previous book, the 2nd edition was last updated in 1975. This edition adds many new tokens, includes color photographs on glossy paper and has a section on Hard Rubber Tokens (also used during the Civil War era.)

How are these different than Patriotic Civil War Tokens?
They advertise the store they were made for instead of supporting the need for emergency money.



This does not include Patriotic Civil War tokens, which I pointed out in an earlier post.

Cost of the new reference: $100
About the price of one graded mint state token to learn about the thousands of types that were made.

(I do not own the example below. I'm waiting on the book to arrive to see if there is a direction I want to pursue.)
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#64 Unread post by mhonzell »

Well, it had to happen eventually... I'm posting a repeat die. The reverse is a die I have posted before, but the token is a different one. Why? Because this combination with the Tradesmens Currency only occurs with the 434 reverse.

F-202/434a

This token represents that crossover boundary between Store Card and Patriotic Civil War Token. The token is simply pointing out that this token is good for 1 cent worth of goods. At the same time, it points out it is not legal currency. The reason it is not a Store Card is that it is good at all locations. It does not advertise any particular store, so it is grouped with the Patriotic tokens.
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#65 Unread post by Daniel »

Nice!

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Re: Civil War Tokens

#66 Unread post by mhonzell »

I put this token on the Memorial Day thread. As Paul pointed out with his article, Memorial Day came to us as a result of the Civil War. Initially, the North and the South celebrated different days by dressing up soldier's gravestones with flowers and flags. Later, they both compromised to celebrate the same day. While this token doesn't actually celebrate Memorial Day, it does point to a particular event during the war... Abraham Lincoln honoring the fallen:
Abraham Lincoln : November 19, 1863 wrote: Four score and seven years ago our fathers brought forth, upon this continent, a new nation, conceived in liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that “all men are created equal.”

Now we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived, and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battle field of that war. We come to dedicate a portion of it, as a final resting place for those who died here, that the nation might live. This we may, in all propriety do.

But, in a larger sense, we can not dedicate – we can not consecrate – we can not hallow, this ground – The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have hallowed it, far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note, nor long remember what we say here; while it can never forget what they did here.

It is rather for us, the living, we here be dedicated to the great task remaining before us – that, from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they here, gave the last full measure of devotion – that we here highly resolve these dead shall not have died in vain; that the nation, shall have a new birth of freedom, and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.
F-244/381a
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#67 Unread post by mhonzell »

George Brinton McClellan was a character. Somewhat insubordinate to Abraham Lincoln, he was sent out to Virginia to test his mettle. Order to defeat Robert E. Lee and capture Richmond, Virginia, Ol' George seems to have somehow always to have been going the other way when General Lee showed up. But, as circumstances would have it, he arrived at Antietam about the time General Lee did and had no where he could walk off to be a bit safer. It was a bloody battle, and to Ol' George's tribtute, he managed to stop General Lee from advancing any further. But, he did not defeat Lee and he failed to take Richmond, Virginia. Abraham Lincoln was not impressed and relieved George of his command.

Well, what to do with all this time as a failed military leader? ... Run for President of the United States. Unfortunately, he was running against Abraham Lincoln as the Democratic candidate. He was not elected, so he ran for Governor of New Jersey. He won! (That should tell you something about New Jersey.

What do you give a failed military leader? A medal... worth one cent.
F-143/261a
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#68 Unread post by Daniel »

Love the history.

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Re: Civil War Tokens

#69 Unread post by mhonzell »

Found this token to be interesting on several levels: F-58/439a

First, the token is oversized. About the size of a quarter at 24mm, whereas all the others have been about the size of a normal cent.
Second, it has a straight clip across the top.
Third, it was struck as a medal instead of a US coin.

The obverse is fairly common except that it is signed by it's creator: L. Roloff.
The reverse is very unique!
Most people think these are Masonic symbols. Some of them did eventually become Masonic symbols, but these are actually symbols of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. This order established homes for senior members and orphans. While the order originated in England, there were disputes between the American and English versions. So, in 1843, some of the American lodges broke off and formed the Independent Order. The group accepted both men and women members, which was highly unusual. Today, the order is international and going strong.

The rings represent: Friendship, Love and Truth.
The heart in hand represents: Charity, and is associated with the Shakers in the Northeast.
The all-seeing eye represents: God.
The bow and arrows represent: (Still looking on this one.)
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Re: Civil War Tokens

#70 Unread post by Paul »

VERY COOL M,
i don't think i've see a 'straight clipped' token/medal. :trophy:
SREC1, or mid-strip?...if ya know??

1. STRAIGHT RAGGED END CLIP (punched from the 'end' of the planchet making roll/strip)
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