Seated Dollar Patterns
1865 $1 Motto Seated Dollar, Judd-434, Pollock-507, Low R.7

A transitional variety that carries the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on a scroll, as first issued on the 1866 Seated dollar, but dated 1865. Struck in silver with a reeded edge. Recent findings have caused experts to reconsider the opinion that this is a restrike issue, created for sale to collectors in the late 1860s and early 1870s. The single most convincing piece of evidence for the restrike theory was the overstruck example of Judd-434 in the Harry W. Bass, Jr. Research Foundation. This specimen was long believed to be overstruck on a business strike 1866 silver dollar--clearly indicating it could not have been minted in 1865. But this clue has recently been reevaluated. Close examination of the Bass example reveals the undertype may be dated 1853, so it is entirely possible that the Judd-434 specimen was coined in 1865. Most experts still believe the coins are restrikes, but they acknowledge the possibility that some examples may be originals, struck as transitional patterns in 1865.
Whether their status is original or restrike, examples of Judd-434 are rare and beautiful coins.

PR64 $26,450.00 (Sep 10, 2009 HA.com)
1867 $1 Dollar, Judd-593, Pollock-657, High R.7

The obverse and reverse are struck from the regular issue dies for the 1867 Seated dollar, in brass with a reeded edge. According to USPatterns.com, only five examples are known in brass.

PR65 $33,350.00 (May 28, 2009 HA.com)
1870 $1 Dollar, Judd-1005, Pollock-1137, Low R.6

The William Barber obverse design showing Liberty seated holding a laurel branch in her left hand, right hand resting on a shield and scroll with a Liberty pole and cap in the background. The reverse is from the regular dies for the Seated dollar of this year. Struck in copper with a plain edge.

PR63 Brown $3,881.25 (Apr 30, 2009 HA.com)
1863 $1 Dollar, Judd-345, Pollock-417, Low R.7

A so-called transitional issue, this pattern uses the dies of the regular Seated Liberty dollar of the year, but it bears the addition of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on a swirling scroll on the reverse, of the type introduced on circulating (intended to circulate, at least) coinage in 1866. Struck in silver with a reeded edge.

The Judd ninth edition comes down firmly on one point--that no two cent pieces made in 1863 also display either the mottos IN GOD WE TRUST or GOD OUR TRUST: "These transitional patterns were not made in 1863 or any time close. None were known to exist until the 1870s and, further, they employ a reverse die thought to have been first used on a regular basis a few years after the date on the coins."

"A series of pattern quarter dollars, half dollars, and silver dollars with motto IN GOD WE TRUST above the eagle on the reverse began this year and continued through 1865. At a later date, possibly 1865, patterns for the silver coins were made with IN GOD WE TRUST. It was a natural marketing idea to resurrect some older Proof dies dated 1863 and 1864 and thus produce patterns for these dates."

The relevant text in the Bowers Bass Museum Sylloge is more direct, although still full of questions: "Certain quarter dollars, half dollars, and silver dollars were struck with the motto IN GOD WE TRUST, ... . Whether these pieces were backdated 1863 and made at a later date is not known. The entire era of the 1860s was one of many private productions for the numismatic trade." USPatterns.com estimates that about a dozen are known, commenting that "these were made after 1866, possibly into the 1870s."

PR66 Cameo $54,625.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1863 $1 Dollar, Judd-346, Pollock-418, R.7

A so-called transitional issue, this pattern uses the dies of the regular Seated Liberty dollar of the year, but it bears the addition of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on a swirling scroll on the reverse, of the type introduced on regular-issue coinage in 1866. Struck in copper with a reeded edge.

Like the silver issues, there is no clear evidence but it appears that these copper pieces were actually later restrikes after the motto IN GOD WE TRUST had been officially adopted. The motto first appeared on the two cent coin that debuted in 1864, before being disseminated to the nation's larger regular-issue coins in 1866.

The copper examples of this pattern appear about equally as rare as the already-rare silver examples, judging by most measures (and those are precious few, in the world of pattern research). There are equal numbers of the Judd-345 (silver) and Judd-346 (copper) certified at NGC--four of each--while PCGS has graded three of the Judd-345 and four of the Judd-346. The always-useful USPatterns.com rates both types R.7 (the site does not as a rule distinguish between Low R.7, R.7, and High R.7), or "about a dozen known."

PR66 Red and Brown Cameo $46,000.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1863 $1 Dollar, Judd-347, Pollock-419, High R.7

A so-called transitional issue, this pattern uses the dies of the regular Seated Liberty dollar of the year, but it bears the addition of the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on a swirling scroll on the reverse, of the type introduced on regular-issue coinage in 1866. Struck in copper with a reeded edge.

Another product of the U.S. Mint that was likely produced some time later than the date it bears, perhaps well into the 1870s. Aluminum was an extreme rarity in 1863 and for a couple of decades after, although its rarity decreased as better ways were found to isolate the highly reactive metal from its many different naturally occurring chemical compounds. The examples in aluminum, rated High R.7 (four to six known) are notably rarer than those in copper and silver, however, with USPatterns.com providing a meager estimate of "at least four known including an example in the American Numismatic Society."

PR67 Cameo $34,500.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1870 $1 Dollar, Judd-1002, Pollock-1134, Low R.6

The William Barber Seated Liberty design. A seated Liberty faces left, with 13 stars ringing the rim and the date 1870 in exergue. She holds a shield with her right hand and an olive branch in her left. A cap rests atop a Liberty pole, and a scroll crosses the shield with LIBERTY thereon. The reverse is from the regular Seated Liberty dollar die of the year. Struck in silver with a reeded edge.

The complete sets offered by the Mint to collectors and including the half dime, dime, quarter, half dollar, and dollar were combined not only as here, with the regular Seated Liberty reverse, but also with the Standard Silver reverse. USPatterns.com estimates that more than a dozen are known of this variety, accounting for the Low R.6 rating in Judd.

PR63 Cameo $6,900.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1870 $1 Dollar, Judd-1021, Pollock-1156, R.8

Both obverse and reverse dies are the designs used for regular-issue coinage of silver dollars in 1870. Struck in aluminum with a reeded edge.

The standard pattern references traditionally list Judd-1021 as a die trials issue, but USPatterns.com states the coins were minted as part of the Mint's marketing program. In support of this view, the present coin was offered as part of an eight-coin 1870 aluminum proof set when it first surfaced in the 1970s. The rarity of the sets was discussed when it was advertised in several issues of the Rare Coin Review: "The number of 1870 aluminum proof sets struck is nowhere recorded. We would estimate the number as being in the range of 5 to 10 sets, nearly all of which have been broken up in the intervening years."

PR67 Cameo $54,625.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1870 $1 Dollar, Judd-1022, Pollock-1157, Low R.7

The regular dies for the 1870 Seated Liberty dollar, but with rusted devices on both sides. Struck in nickel with a reeded edge.

About half a dozen of these patterns survive in nickel, struck from proof dies and business strike dies, according to Saul Teichman at USPatterns.com. The rusted design motifs suggest that this pattern was struck sometime after 1870. We are unaware of any specific diagnostic studies of the dies, but offer the following observations: The inside top of the 0 in the date appears to be minutely recut, the shield point is over the center of the upright of the 1, the left base of the 1 is over the center of a dentil, and the date is approximately centered between the border and the base of Liberty. The reverse has a short die line at the top of E in WE.

PR66 Cameo $20,700.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1872 $1 Dollar, Judd-1210, Pollock-1350, R.8

The regular Seated Liberty With Motto design, the motto boldly doubled as seen on regular issue proofs dated 1872 and 1873. Struck in copper with a reeded edge.

The 1872 copper dollars from the regular dies were not trial pieces as often recorded, but instead were part of off-metal coinage sets that the Mint marketed to contemporary collectors. The off-metal pattern sets were coined in both copper and aluminum (Judd-1211).

The complete coinage set in copper contained the cent (Judd-1179), two cent (Judd-1183), coronet three cent (Judd-1185), trime (Judd-1187), five cent (Judd-1189), half dime (Judd-1191), dime (Judd-1193), quarter (Judd-1198), half dollar (Judd-1203), dollar (Judd-1210), gold dollar (Judd-1227), quarter eagle (Judd-1233), three dollar (Judd-1238), half eagle (Judd-1243), eagle (Judd-1248), and double eagle (Judd-1253).

PR65 Brown NGC $57,500.00 (HA.com Jan 6, 2009)


Source for information and pictures courtesy of  Heritage Coin Auctions
Get our toolbar!
Iphone and Android coin applications by CoinHelp! Click Here
CoinHELP!
Check Our Facebook CoinHELP! Fan Page
Have numismatic question click here