1850 1C Cent, Judd-124G, Pollock-145, High R.7

A hub or die trial with the obverse simply inscribed CENT * *1850 around a circle in the center that was obviously an outline for perforation as with other cent patterns from this year. The reverse is plain except for denticles and an upset rim. Struck in nickel with a plain edge. Formerly an Appendix A pattern in the 1st through 7th editions of Judd. Fewer than half a dozen pieces are believed known.

PR65  $3,450.00 (Feb 5, 2009 HA.com)
1850 P1C One Cent, Judd-124 Restrike, Pollock-139, Low R.7

ONE above, CENT below a central ringed area, which on some of its siblings is perforated, but not here. Rosettes are to the left and right. The reverse offers USA above, ONE TENTH SILVER at top and bottom. Struck in copper-nickel with a plain edge.

An experiment in producing a smaller-size cent piece, one intended, of course, to be produced in silver with a central perforation to lower the weight and corresponding silver content. The originals were produced in billon (90% copper, 10% silver), with weights from 24 to 26 grains, but they were too subject to counterfeiting, among other difficulties with the issue.

PR64 $2,875.00 Jan 6, 2009 (HA.com)
1850 P1C One Cent, Judd-119 Original, Pollock-134, Low R.6 "Billon Alloy"

The obverse displays the denomination CENT at the top, the date 1850 at the bottom, two rosettes at the sides, and a perforation in the center. The shattered reverse has the inscriptions USA and ONE TENTH SILVER around. Struck in billon (10% silver, 90% copper) with a plain edge.

PR63 $1,840.00 (Jan 10, 2008 HA.com)
1850 P1C One Cent, Judd-124g, Pollock-143, R.8

Uniface pattern struck on an unperforated annular (ring) planchet. The obverse has CENT above and 1850 below, with stars flanking. The reverse has dentils around the reverse border, but no lettering or motifs. Struck in nickel or copper-nickel with a plain edge. Less than a half dozen pieces are known of this rarity.

PR65 $8,050.00 (Sep 27, 2007 HA.com)
1850 P1C Annular One Cent, Judd-121, Pollock-136, High R.6

Struck on an annular (ring) planchet. The obverse has USA above and ONE TENTH SILVER below the opening. On the reverse two stars flank the central opening, with CENT above and 1850 below. Struck in copper with a plain edge.

As early as 1850 Mint officials undertook to replace the large coppers in circulation with something smaller, yet still containing an acceptable margin--acceptable both to the government and to consumers--of intrinsic value. A series of annular or ring-shaped coins, composed of billon, an alloy of 90% copper and 10% silver, neatly suited both the desire for a larger copper cent than would otherwise be possible, along with a coin that was larger than it would otherwise be. Other strikings were produced in copper and copper-nickel.

PR65 Brown $4,025.00 (Jan 2, 2007 HA.com)
1850 P1C One Cent, Judd Appendix A, Pollock-145, R.7

The obverse is blank with the exception of denticles at the border. The reverse displays the denomination CENT at the top, the date 1850 at the bottom, and one star at either side of the center. The reverse design is similar to that used on the 1850 Annular Pattern Cent (Judd-119, Pollock-134), but the center is not perforated. Struck in nickel with a plain edge.

PR64 $2,070.00 (Apr 5, 2001 HA.com)
1851 P1C One Cent, Judd-127 Original, Pollock-149, Low R.6

The simple obverse design consists of the peripheral notations CENT above, and ONE TENTH SILVER below. The reverse employs an open wreath, with the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA around. Medallic turn. Struck on a perforated billon planchet with a plain edge.

A bill drafted by Congressman Sam F. Vinton in 1849 called for a reduction in the size of the one cent coin. Judd-127 was an experimental attempt to reduce the size of the coin, while maintaining the same intrinsic value. The perforated annular planchet made it easy to distinguish the coin from a dime, which was nearly the same size. Unfortunately, the annular design created many problems in the striking process, particularly with ejection of the struck coins. The small size Flying Eagle cent was eventually selected to replace the old large cent design.

PR64 $2,300.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
1851 P1C One Cent, Judd-131A Restrike, Pollock-156, High R.7

This simple undated pattern features the legends CENT/ONE TENTH SILVER on the obverse, while UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and a small wreath decorate the reverse. Struck in nickel with a reeded edge. These restrikes are similar to standard coin nickel. Fewer than a half dozen pieces are known.

PR66 $5,175.00 (Sep 13, 2006 HA.com)
1851 P1C One Cent, Judd-130 Restrike, Pollock-154, High R.7

The obverse displays the denomination CENT above and the composition ONE TENTH SILVER below. On the reverse, the legend UNITED STATES OF AMERICA surrounds a laurel wreath. The date is not part of the design. All Judd-130 pieces are restrikes, and possess non-perforated centers. Struck in copper with a plain edge.

PR64 Red and Brown $5,750.00 (Jun 1, 2006 HA.com)
(1851) P1C One Cent, Judd-131, Pollock-155, R.8

This simple undated pattern features the legends CENT/ONE TENTH SILVER on the obverse, while UNITED STATES OF AMERICA and a small wreath decorate the reverse. Struck in copper-nickel with a reeded edge. Generally believed to be a restrike, since the centers are not perforated unlike the annular Judd-127 to Judd-129 counterparts. Judd-131 is listed as R.8 in the Bowers revision of Judd (2003), although uspatterns.com states that "about a half dozen are known."

PR65 $4,255.00 (Jul 20, 2004 HA.com)
1884 1C One Cent, Judd-1722, Pollock-1930, Low R.7

Eastman Johnson's "holey" design for the cent with an irregular-edged hole pierced through the center. The statutory legends exclude LIBERTY and IN GOD WE TRUST. The lower reverse has an inverted Federal shield and two laurel branches. Struck in aluminum with a plain edge.

PR65 $6,325.00 (Jan 10, 2008 HA.com)
1885 1C One Cent, Judd-1740, Pollock-1950, High R.6

This annular pattern cent has a central perforation with a smooth, raised edge. The obverse has UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above with the date 1885/3 at the bottom of that side. On the reverse, ONE CENT is in large letters at the top with a small shield below flanked by laurel sprigs. Struck in silver with a plain edge.

PR63 $3,737.50 (Jan 10, 2008 HA.com)
Undated (1853) 1C One Cent, Judd-151d, Pollock-178, Low R.7

The obverse is unfinished except for the dentils around the border. The reverse displays the denomination ONE CENT within a laurel wreath. Struck in billon with a plain edge. These pieces were struck under hurried conditions as a substitute for the cumbersome large cents.

PR65 $4,025.00 (Mar 24, 2005 HA.com)
Undated 1C 1858-1 One Cent Splasher, Judd Appendix A, Pollock-3161, Unique

A complete reverse die trial with a laurel wreath, arranged with the leaves in groups of five. This same design was also used on Judd-191, Judd-202, and Judd-208, according to USPatterns.com. Struck in white metal with paper backing. The surfaces are only slightly muted from their original brilliance, and the paper backing is almost complete. A piece of the rim is broken off from 2 to 3 o'clock. This is the only piece believed known of this die trial.

MS64 $12,650.00 (Jan 5, 2006 HA.com)
1884 1C One Cent, Judd-1721, Pollock-1929, R.5

The Eastman Johnson "holey cent" design. The planchet is holed at the center. The obverse has UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above and the date below, with no other design or ornament. The reverse shows ONE CENT above with an inverted shield and wheat stalks below, within which the fields are open. Struck in nickel with a plain edge.

Both one cent and five cent patterns of this year feature the unusual Eastman Johnson "holey" design, apparently spurred by comments that the artist made in 1870, according to the Pollock reference. Some three to four dozen examples likely exist today.

PR64 $2,530.00 (Jan 6, 2009 HA.com)
Annular - Holey Cent Pattern Coins
1853 E1C One Cent, Judd-152, Pollock-140, R.7

On the obverse (which is mounted in the PCGS holder as the reverse), the denomination CENT is at the top, two stars are at the sides, and the date 1850 is below. Despite the presence of the latter device, all examples of this type are thought to have been coined no earlier than 1853. The reverse displays another expression of the denomination, ONE CENT, within a laurel wreath. Struck in German silver (a nickel, copper, and zinc alloy) with a plain edge.

PR65 $4,140.00 (Mar 20, 2003 HA.com)
Source for information and pictures courtesy of  Heritage Coin Auctions
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